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Thread: Avoiding tendinitis???

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    Default Avoiding tendinitis???

    I was reading the other day about how it is common for tatters to get tendinitis. Is there something we can do to avoid that? Was it more common for post shuttle and needle tatters?? Would using a a bobbin shuttle help?
    Thanks for helping this newbie!!

  2. #2
    Administrator Lynn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Avoiding tendinitis???

    First and foremost, and not to be stressed too much, if you suspect you may be getting tendinitis, stop tatting and see a doctor. To avoid the onset, best to switch fiber addictions from time to time. I tat, but I also knit and crochet. Changing it up is a good way to protect yourself. It's also good to take frequent breaks. It's the small repetitive movements that can bring on tendinitis, so any type of tatting can cause it. Take reasonable precautions, be attentive to you own body's trouble signs, and see a doctor as soon as you suspect you may have a problem.
    Blessings <>< Lynn
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    Administrator PattyD's Avatar
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    Default Re: Avoiding tendinitis???

    I also find that it depends on your movements. Crochet is okay for me is short sessions, but long hours crocheting will bring tendinitis in my wrists. Knitting is okay for me if I use circular needles so that I don't have any weight out at the ends of straight needles. So far, tatting doesn't trouble me at all. It all depends on your the way your hands and arms are structured and we are all different in that regard. To crochet at all these days I changed my method of tatting from holding the hook like a spoon to holding it like a knife and letting my whole arm do the moving. No pain. I'm good with that.

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    Administrator Susan B T's Avatar
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    Default Re: Avoiding tendinitis???

    Any motion, repeated for hours or days can cause problems. The are all sorts of work related hand, wrist and arm movements that cause problems.. It is the repeating of the same motions with out rests or opposite movements that can cause problems. The rule of no pain-no gain is false. It it hurts STOP! Hand exercises help, warm water, hand massages with lotion.
    A very important thing in tatting is stay relaxed and enjoy it. If you are tensing up, put your work down and come back after you have rested. Prevention is the key.
    SUSAN

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    Social Butterfly Elfiona's Avatar
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    Default Re: Avoiding tendinitis???

    I was going to say pretty much what Susan said. Your hand and fingers, even though extended out to hold the thread, should still be relaxed. If you are pressing against the thread too hard, you will tire quickly and develop pain. Same with the hand holding the shuttle. You don't want to grip it too hard, either. You may tire faster in the beginning, when you are still learning the stitches and how to hold both hands through all the steps of tatting, so don't forget to take frequent breaks.
    Sherry
    "The creative mind is seldom tidy."

  6. #6


    Default Re: Avoiding tendinitis???

    For me tatting is the thing I can do for the longest time without feeling any pain. I prefer working with soft thread, although most people prefer a stiffer one. We all are different.

    When crocheting I have made a handle by winding a soft, but firm material around it. Just fastened it with strong tape. I tire much less when I use that. You may buy hooks with a handle, but it is more expensive. Besides, I have adjusted the handle for my own hand. I also prefer working with wool because it is soft and elastic. For me it is very hard working with a small hook (smaller than 3mm). That is why tatting is so fascinating. Now I can make thin lace without struggling with that small hook and the tiny stitches.

  7. #7


    Default Re: Avoiding tendinitis???

    a wine cork makes a very comfortable handle for crochet needles. it does not work so well on the tiny ones though.

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    Social Butterfly Elfiona's Avatar
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    Default Re: Avoiding tendinitis???

    I'm surprised that crocheting doesn't give me more difficulty as I have arthritis in both my hands. I have always preferred working the the cotton threads, but agree with TriCreative about wool yarn. But I don't hold my crochet hook the way a lot of people do either.
    Sherry
    "The creative mind is seldom tidy."

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    Mingler Karen Bickerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Avoiding tendinitis???

    I have both fibromyalgia and tendonitis, and one of the biggies is to take short breaks regularly. When my hands are playing up, I put on a timer and every 20 min I have to take a 5 minute break and do something different, and every 5th break is 20 minutes long. My cat has gotten so use to the five minute breaks he demands petting every 20 minutes! The long breaks I acutally get out of my chair and have snack or do some housework. ;)

  10. #10


    Default Re: Avoiding tendinitis???

    I do have problems with my tendons in my hands and wrists and theres a lot of things you can do to make it less painful. I've found that using 'muscle rub' cream helps, so does applying an ice pack and occasionally a heating pad on your hands can help. I also wear an arm/wrist brace from time to time, though I don't suggest doing that without speaking with your doctor to see if you're wearing the right kind of brace. The same goes for hand exercises, always speak with your doctor to make sure that you're doing ones that will help, not hurt.

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